Welcome to CogTale!

Interested in cognitive interventions, but confused about what you hear in the media? Want to take a closer look at the evidence, but not sure what information to trust? 

What is CogTale?

CogTale is a comprehensive database of design (methodological) features and summary results from all relevant trials of cognitive interventions in the field of cognitive ageing.

 

The scientists behind CogTale are passionate about research on cognitive interventions in older age, and about assisting consumers in making informed treatment decisions, by providing up-to-date, evidence-based information on cognitive intervention treatments. 

 

CogTale is currently in a 'pilot' phase (Beta Release), which means that data and articles are being continuously added to the platform, and the website is subject to regular change.

 

Create a CogTale Account

Creating a CogTale user account will allow you to bookmark studies, synthesize evidence from multiple studies, and receive detailed evidence reports by email

Search, Compare, & Get a Report

Perform simple or advanced searches using our continuously updated database, learn about the quality and results of different studies, and get a report sent to your email

Join our Newsletter

Sign up to get evidence updates sent directly to your mailbox! (available soon)

Articles Published
Articles Queued
Summaries Delivered

CogTale Resources

Learn how to interpret your search findings using a range of resources available on the CogTale website:

Research Quality

Learn about the metrics we use to rate the methodological quality of studies in the CogTale database.

Meta Analyses Explained

Learn about interpreting the results of a meta-analysis.

Effect Sizes

Learn about different types of effect sizes and how to interpret and understand them.

CogTale Blog

Twitter

New Cochrane Review on cognitive training for people with dementia

By Julieta Sabates | May 9, 2019

Cognitive training for people with mild to moderate dementia Bahar-Fuchs A, Martyr A, Goh AMY, Sabates J, Clare L (2019) Dementia due to Alzheimer’s and other diseases is a leading cause of disability and an enormous health and societal problem. More than 40 million people in the world currently live with dementia, and this number…

American Academy of Neurology: Cognitive training included in new Practice Guidelines for older adults with mild cognitive impairment

By Alex Bahar-Fuchs | August 13, 2018

Older people with memory and thinking problems that are not severe enough to interfere with daily routines and activities are often diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment, or MCI. The memory and thinking problems can be the result of various factors, some of which may be related to underlying neurodegenerative disease, and some that may secondary…

First CogTale workshop held in Chicago

By Alex Bahar-Fuchs | August 6, 2018

On July 22-26, over 5,000 researchers from over 70 countries have gathered in Chicago for the world’s largest dementia-related meeting, the 2018 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference.  Members of the CIDER working party were pleased to share CogTale for the first time with some of our colleagues from around the world and present both a poster…

Cognitive rehabilitation: An enablement approach

By Alex Bahar-Fuchs | October 26, 2017 | 0 Comments

This is an extract from an article published by Bahar-Fuchs et al. 2016 Helping people with dementia learn Evidence from experimental studies shows that, when provided with appropriate support, people with early stage or mild dementia can learn or relearn relevant information, as well as adapt their behaviour, and develop new routines, skills and habits.…

About cognitive treatments

By Alex Bahar-Fuchs | October 5, 2017 | 0 Comments

Cognition-oriented treatments (COTs) are part of a broad family of non-drug treatments, that aim to improve or maintain cognition and functional independence. In these types of interventions, individuals engage in a range of tasks and activities that directly or indirectly focus on cognitive processes and functional skills. Sometimes, these interventions are quite broad and don’t…

Meet the Team

Our team consists of leading clinical researchers located around the world,  passionate about developing effective lifestyle interventions to prevent or minimise cognitive decline.

Alex Bahar-Fuchs, PhD

The University of Melbourne, Australia

Sylvie Belleville, PhD

Universite de Montreal, Canada

Benjamin Hampstead, PhD

The University of Michigan, USA

Tzvi Dwolatzky, MD

Rambam Health Care, Haifa, Israel

Sharon Sanz-Simon, PhD

The University of Sao Paulo

Mary Castellani,

BPsych (Hons)

The University of Melbourne, Australia

 

Belinda Goodenough, PhD

University of Wollongong (Dementia Training Australia)

 

Kaarin Anstey, PhD

University of NSW

 

 

Amit Lampit, PhD

The University of Melbourne

 

Contact Us

We would love to hear from you!

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